Hurricane Preparation

Plant of the Month – September 2017

Erin Porter, Landscape Architect PLA

All of us at Cotleur & Hearing sincerely hope that everyone weathered Hurricane Irma well and made it through with minimal or no damage to yourselves or your homes.  Many of you probably have at least some damage to landscape, particularly palms and trees.

This month we are featuring the aptly named Hurricane palm, or Princess palm.  This pretty palm has large, long, feathery fronds and is slow growing.  It is native to the Mascarene Islands, west of Madagascar in the Indian Ocean, but is almost extinct in its natural habitat. These palms prefer warm humid air and don’t tolerate drought well, which makes them perfect for South Florida.  They are well suited for strong winds and the salt air. Consider the Hurricane palm if you are in need of a new palm for your home or office landscape. Stay safe the rest of hurricane season 2017!

SOURCES:                               

http://www.palmpedia.net/wiki/Dictyosperma_album

http://www.palmbeachpalmcycadsociety.com/palms/documents/DictyospermaAlbum.pdf

http://www.florida-palm-trees.com/princess-palm-tree/

Plant of the Month – September 2016

Erin Porter, Landscape Architect PLA

Erin Porter, Landscape Architect PLA

One Palm, Two Palm… Green Palm, Thatch Palm!  With everyone safely back in school, we wanted to showcase a very Dr. Seuss-looking Florida native, the thatch palm. Found in warm South Florida, the Bahamas and Jamaica, the thatch palm is actually cold hardy down to 28 degrees. The thatch palm is a great plant for any landscape. When young, it acts as a small, bushy accent palm and as it matures, it becomes an attractive,slender trunk palm.

We often use the thatch palm in beachy environments mixed with grasses or under a large canopy tree.  The thatch palm is extremely slow growing, sometimes less than 6” a year which makes it ideal for small spaces.  Take note of the tall thatch palms you see in the Florida Keys and the Bahamas, they likely took decades to become the slender giants you see today.

thatch-palm

SOURCES:                                                  http://lee.ifas.ufl.edu/Hort/GardenPubsAZ/Florida_Thatch_Palm.pdf

http://www.palmpedia.net/wiki/Thrinax_radiata

Plant of the Month – February 2015

Daniel Sugg

Daniel Sugg

 

The February Plant of the Month is Licuala peltata v. sumawongii, the Pleated Licuala.  This striking Licuala greatly resembles Licuala grandis but grows faster, tolerates more sun and cooler temperatures. The Pleated Licuala is also larger than Licuala grandis, up to 12’ in height and one frond can reach up to 6’ across.

To keep the beautiful fronds intact it is best suited for a protected area from wind. Although this variety can take sun for the best color and performance plant in an area with part shade and water regularly.  With proper care the Pleated Licuala will quickly become the highlight of the garden.

 

SOURCES:

http://www.tropicalpaisagismo.com.br/produto-detalhe.php?id_produto=33

http://www.palmbeachpalmcycadsociety.com/palms/documents/Licuala.pdf

http://www.excelsagardens.com/?page_id=2353

http://www.dasignsourcebotanicals.com/plant_details.cfm?id=428

Pleated Licuala

Plant of the Month November 2014

Daniel Sugg

Daniel Sugg

 

The November plant of the month is Coccothrinax crinita, the Old Man Palm.  The Old Man Palm has an interesting and unique look.  The stiff fronds are fan shaped and sit atop a straight single trunk which is fully covered in brown hair-like fibers.  It can eventually grow to around 20′ tall, however it is very slow growing.  It is somewhat resistant to cold snaps and can tolerate brief dips into the high 20’s.

The Old Man Palm makes a great accent palm.  Larger specimens have a stately appearance and add interest in the landscape.  It also works well in a container.

 

 

SOURCES:

http://www.dasignsourcebotanicals.com/plant_details.cfm?id=528

http://www.palmpedia.net/wiki/Coccothrinax_crinita

Coccothrinax_Old Man Palm

Plant of the Month August 2014

Daniel Sugg

Daniel Sugg

The August plant of the month is Corypha umbraculifera, the Talipot Palm.  This palm is one of my all time favorites.

The Talipot Palm is a true giant.  One of the fronds can be between 15’-25’ wide attached to a 10’-15’ long petiole (to get a true sense of the size of these massive beauties, look closely at some of the pictures to see the size of the palm compared to the people standing next to them).  Historically the fronds were used for thatching and umbrellas and the sap was tapped to make wine.  The bloom is the largest inflorescence in the plant kingdom.

These palms will live around 80 years and bloom only once, after the impressive bloom and the fruit develops the palm begins to die.  The Talipot Palm is a very slow grower so you can enjoy them for a long time.

I highly suggest you go see this palm in person to truly appreciate it.  Las Olas Riverwalk in Fort Lauderdale, Fairchild Tropical Garden in Coral Gables, and Ocean Reef Club in Key Largo are some of the places where I have seen some impressive specimens.  If you have the space and want a true jaw-dropping specimen, the Talipot Palm is hard to beat.

SOURCES:

http://www.palmpedia.net/wiki/Corypha_umbraculifera

http://www.dasignsourcebotanicals.com/

Corypha umbraculifera

Plant of the Month June 2014

Daniel Sugg

Daniel Sugg

The June Plant of the Month is Latania loddigesii, The Blue Latan Palm.

At first glance people may mistake this specimen palm for a small Bismarck Palm.  Although their appearance is similar, the Blue Latan is a much slower grower and stays smaller.  The size and growth rate of the Blue Latan makes it a great substitute for the Bismarck in smaller gardens and tighter spaces.

It is a durable palm with good drought and salt tolerance. This striking palm makes a great specimen piece in the landscape that will surely catch everyone’s eye.

 

SOURCES:

http://toptropicals.com/cgibin/garden_catalog/cat.cgi?uid=Latania_loddigesii

http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/st350

 

Latania loddigesii_Blue Latan Palm

Plant of the Month – June 2013

Daniel_Sugg_Cotleur& Hearing_Landscape_Company

Daniel Sugg

A NOTE FROM DANIEL SUGG: The June plant of the month is the rare and beautiful Copernicia macroglossa, the Cuban Petticoat Palm.  The Cuban Petticoat Palm is a specimen palm that makes an intense visual impact with its upright fan shaped fronds that emerge from the trunk and eventually fold over as they age.  If not trimmed the dead fronds fold down around the trunk and make the “petticoat” for which it is named.  The Cuban Petticoat Palm is extremely slow growing and as it ages it becomes more interesting, you will enjoy this show stopping specimen palm for a long time to come.

SOURCES:http://www.floridata.com/ref/c/cope_mac.cfm

Landscape Plants for South Florida, by George K. Rodgers

http://www.dasignsourcebotanicals.com/plant_details.cfm?id=357

Plant of the Month 6-2013 Copernicia macroglossa Cuban Petticoat Palm