Accents

Plant of the Month – November 2017

Erin Porter, Landscape Architect PLA

I am often asked for a plant that is low maintenance, is drought tolerant, and flowers.  The native blue Porterweed is one of my favorites and not just because we share a name.  This plant has a sprawling nature and whimsical flower spikes that suggest a cottage garden feel.

The blue Porterweed prefers full sun and does not require much water once it is established.  The small delicate flowers are a nectar source for many pollinators, butterflies, and hummingbirds. If the plant gets too large or full of woody stems, cut it back hard in the spring and the blue Porterweed will grow back with fresh new leaves.

SOURCES:

http://www.fnps.org/plants/plant/stachytarpheta-jamaicensis

http://www.regionalconservation.org/beta/nfyn/plantdetail.asp?tx=Stacjama

http://lee.ifas.ufl.edu/Hort/GardenPubsAZ/Blue_porterweed.pdf

Plant of the Month – February 2017

Erin Porter, Landscape Architect PLA

Neoregelia bromeliads are an excellent choice for long lasting color in a tropical landscape. There are hundreds of varieties of Neoregelia bromeliads to choose from, with a wide range of colors. In honor of Valentine’s Day, we suggest “Valentine’s” and “Romance”, both featuring a bright pink color and a love for filtered sun. For full sun varieties look to “Jill” or “Bossa Nova” or even “Fireball”. These varieties grow upon themselves to form a groundcover or hanging chain.
The Neoregelia’s leaves are arranged in a circular pattern around a central cup, which often hold a small amount of water to keep the plant happy. It is important to wash out or change the water once a week. Many Neoregelia have sharp serrated edges, so be careful when moving the plants around. The other wonderful part about bromeliads is that a plant will “pup” or send out smaller babies. These can be separated and planted. Soon your garden will be full of beautiful tropical color.

Happy Valentine’s Day!

SOURCES:

http://bullisbrom.com/

http://www.oglesbytc.com/cultural-notes/bromeliad-3/

http://bromeliadsocietyhouston.org/genera-intro/neoregelia/

Plant of the Month – August 2016

Erin Porter, PLA [Left] This month was a collaborative effort with Landscape Designer Michelle Regan. [Right]

Erin Porter, PLA [Left] This month was a collaborative effort with Landscape Designer Michelle Regan. [Right]

Presenting… Horsetail Reed – Equisetum Hyemale, that sleek, edgy plant you have been searching for! This ancient perennial has become a staple for modern and contemporary landscapes of South Florida. The vertical, grass-like form offers a great evergreen backdrop for an ornamental water garden or as an accent plant in a modern landscape.

Horsetail Reed can be an aggressive grower in the right conditions. Therefore, we would highly recommend bio root barriers or planting in containers.

Horsetail Reed

 

 

Sources:

http://www.fnps.org

http://floridata.com

http://davesgarden.com

Plant of the Month – July 2016

Erin Porter, Landscape Architect PLA

Erin Porter, Landscape Architect PLA

It’s HOT! In this July heat, there is no place I would rather be than on the beach and the Dune Sunflower, Helianthus debilis, would agree.

This fast-growing groundcover is a Florida Native and is well suited to sandy, salty and hot conditions.  The Dune Sunflower (also known as the Beach Sunflower) is a creeping groundcover with plentiful and showy flowers providing year round interest to the landscape.

It can be used to stabilize beach dunes and is planted in residential or commercial landscapes. Happy plants will bloom for several years. As the plant ages, they can have woody stems, so be sure to remove the dying stems to keep the plant looking its best.

Dune Sunflower

Plant of the Month – June 2016

PorterE

Erin Porter, PLA

This month we are bringing the Hidden Ginger into the spotlight.  The curcuma is a relative of the variegated shell ginger plant with similar elliptical leaves. The light green leaves have dark veins and a pink or red midvein.  While the leaves themselves are very beautiful, the true gem is the flower.  The soft pink torch-like spike flowers bloom in the late spring or early summer. As summer progresses, the leaves emerge concealing the flowers.

This is a perennial plant and is dormant in the winter.  If planted in hardiness zone nine (9) and south, our recommendation is to leave the plant in the ground and wait for it to return in the spring. However, if planted zone eight (8) or farther north, consider bringing the plant indoors for the winter.  Hidden Ginger can be difficult to find, if you see one at your local nursery, take a chance and brighten up a shady spot in your yard.

 Hidden Ginger

Plant of the Month – October 2015

Erin Porter

Erin Porter

The dwarf chenille plant is a fascinating groundcover that begs to be touched.  The most striking feature is the fuzzy upright blooms, resembling bright pink/red caterpillars; they will decorate this plant almost year round.  Dwarf chenille will creep and fill in small areas or trail nicely over a hanging basket or retaining wall.  While this colorful plant can be used as an annual, it is actually a perennial and can be used as such, although in some cases may require replacement after a few years.

SOURCES:

www.south-florida-plant-guide.com

https://edis/ifas/ufl/edu

www.guide-to-houseplants.com

Dwarf Chenille

Plant of the Month – July 2015

Erin Porter

Erin Porter

 

July’s plant of the month is the Philodendon ‘Burle Marx’.

Named for the famous Brazilian landscape architect Roberto Burle Marx, this tropical favorite adds a lush feel to any South Florida landscape. The shiny, clumping groundcover is one of my favorites and can even be used as an indoor houseplant.

 

 

 

SOURCES:

http://miami-dade.ifas.ufl.edu/old/programs/fyn/publications/drought-tolerant-plants/dtpl-vines.htm

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roberto_Burle_Marx

http://www.alllandscapedata.com

Plant of the Month – March 2015

Daniel Sugg

Daniel Sugg

The March Plant of the Month is the Clusia guttifera ‘nana’, the Dwarf Small Leaf Clusia.  You probably have seen the regular Clusia guttifera used a hedge or small tree.

The Dwarf Small Leaf Clusia has much smaller leaves and can ultimately grow to around 5’ tall but usually is around 2’-3’ with just as much spread.  The thick, bright green paddle shaped leaves add a nice texture to the landscape.  The Clusia guttifera ‘nana’ has good salt and drought tolerance, which makes it applicable for many areas in South Florida.

The low growing and spreading nature makes this Clusia a great alternative to Green Island Ficus with much less maintenance.  It also makes a great container plant and bonsai specimen.

 

 

SOURCES:

http://www.south-florida-plant-guide.com/dwarf-clusia.html

http://treeworldwholesale.com/product/clusia-nana/

http://www.palmcitypalm.com/ 

Clusia guttifera nana

 

Plant of the Month January 2015

Daniel Sugg

Daniel Sugg

 

The January Plant of the Month is Ernodea littoralis, the Golden Creeper.  The Golden Creeper or Beach Creeper is a low spreading groundcover native to the coast of southern Florida.  It is a great plant for coastal landscapes or areas with little to no irrigation as it has high salt and drought tolerance.  It is commonly used in dune restorations but can also be a great addition to the landscape.  It will thrive in full sun growing up to 3’ tall.  The fine texture and golden color make a great native alternative to some of the more overused groundcovers.

SOURCES:

http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fp196

http://www.fnps.org/plants/plant/ernodea-littoralis

 

Ernodea littoralis_Golden Creeper